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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 74 (some duplicates have been removed)
. in june of 2009, fbi directer acknowledged the challenge facing the bureau stating, "it is not sufficient for us as an organization to respond to a terrorist attack after it has occurred. it is important for us as an organization to develop the intelligence to anticipate the terrorist attack developing intelligence, developing facts. and the past we looked at collecting facts for the courtroom. we now have to think of ourselves as gathering facts painting a picture of a particular threat understanding the risk and moving to reduce that risk. and i couldn't agree more with the directer's statement. and then on november 5, 2009, a gunman walked in the soldier readiness center at fort hood, texas and shouted the jihaddic term. and opened fire on unarmed soldiers and civilians. he killed 13 and wounded 43 42 others. was the most horrific terrorist attack on the u.s. soil since 9/11. today we will exam the facts of the fort hood case as we know them to better understand how these facts that seem so obviously alarming now were so missed by seasoned professionals and to understand how the fbi
, two of the three organizations testifying today did not exist. and the third, the f.b.i., was a very different organization than it is today. focused on domestic crime as it had been for quite a while. obviously in the aftermath of the terrorist attacks on america of 9/11, 2001, congress and the executive branch created the department of homeland security and then pursuant to the 9/11 commission recommendation created the national counterterrorism center. the f.b.i. essentially recreated itself into a first rate domestic counterterrorism intelligence agency. in addition to carrying out all its other responsibilities. in his absence we should thank director mueller for what i think is an extraordinary job he's done in overseeing this historic transformation and to thank the two of you, secretary napolitano, and director olsen, for what you have done together these changes represent the most significant reforms of america's national security organizations since the 1940's, at the beginning of the cold war. it's not coincidental since after 9/11 we understood we were facing a very diffe
: f.b.i. on the ground in libya hunting those that rioted in been gadz zi. they are stepping up drone flights and sending intelligence agents to search for those suspected of killing ambassador christopher stevens and three other americans. u.s. officials say they have found no evidence pointing to a particular group or indicating the attack was planned. >>> as investigators try to close on in the killers in libya no questions are being raised at home. the white house claiming that there was no actionable intelligence, those are their words, pointing to an attack on the consulate but members of the congress saying there were multiple attacks on diplomatic attacks in benghazi and the consulate was a clear target. molly henneberg has more details from the white house. >> molly: there was an ide attack on that same consulate in benghazi in june. then the red cross in benghazi came under attack in august. they insist the 9/11 was in response to a privately made video posted on youtube in june that though found offensive. here is what part of the president said about it. >> there is no rel
that was not enough to warrant an investigation. there was nothing the fbi could point to which would single him out for special investigation or attention. was this an intelligence failure in wisconsin? >do you think there could have been things done to prevent this attack that were not done? >> i think the fbi late at where the problem was. they're really good at investigating after the fact, after things happen, but we had a delicate balance between people's constitutional right to assemble and express their speech, however weil, but we also have to be board cleaning and look at ideologies that have long histories of -- forward- looking and the ideologies that have long histories of spawning violence. i'm not talking about doing covert operations and people with extremist police, but i think it is important we have an overt monitoring police system on what is causing people to act of violence may. was this an intelligence failure? i do not think it is. but one thing the department of homeland security and the fbi could have done -- where was the warning the that sikhs and muslims have been victim
at a flea market. she bought this for $7, planned to sell it to the highest bidder. why the fbi is now saying not so fast. when you take a closer look... ...at the best schools in the world... ...you see they all have something very interesting in common. they have teachers... ...with a deeper knowledge of their subjects. as a result, their students achieve at a higher level. let's develop more stars in education. let's invest in our teachers... ...so they can inspire our students. let's solve this. and the candidate's speech is in pieces all over the district. the writer's desktop and the coordinator's phone are working on a joke with local color. the secure cloud just received a revised intro from the strategist's tablet. and while i make my way into the venue, the candidate will be rehearsing off of his phone. [ candidate ] and thanks to every young face i see out there. [ woman ] his phone is one of his biggest supporters. [ female announcer ] with cisco at the center... working together has never worked so well. [ "the odd couple" theme playing ] humans. even when we cross our "t"
to help libyans. gregg: greg palkot joins me by telephone in tripoli. we understand, greg, the fbi is still there on the ground. what is the latest you're hearing? >> reporter: that's right, gregg. we spoke with an official that fbi agent remain in tripoli. we don't have any confirmation that they have yet to reach the scene of the killing that killed ambassador stevens and others in ben dwauz gazi. it is not especially safe. but there are worry that is the crime scene 10 days later could be contaminated. a marine anti-terror fast response team remains in tripoli as well. the embassy is well-guarded amid other questions being raised the night of the killing u.s. military teams were not sent in fast enough and questions about inadequate security at the consulate and maybe not enough attention paid to other attacks happening in benghazi over the past couple months. we've been hearing in our time on the ground here, at least to some degree, the militants, militia very much in charge in benghazi. gregg? gregg: we're hearing there is a protest and counter protest in libya. what can you
the integrity of what is now an fbi investigation. one of the first thing law enforcement officers do when they begin an investigation is secure the crime scene. first and foremost, this is the consulate. now, they were going to have challenges to that. the fbi couldn't get in because of security conditions. u.s. personnel, nonessential personnel had been sent home. there were fewer to do that. but the fbi, frankly, once they opened an investigation, ordinarily should have and may have, we don't know, but should have coordinated with their u.s. government agency counterparts. if they couldn't secure it, you ask the host government. if the host government is incapable, we did fly in additional marines to guard the embassy in tripoli. was there military u.s. personnel available to help secure it. obviously that didn't happen. it's one of those unanswered questions we don't know but what we do know is the consequences of failing to secure the crime scene absolutely will call into question the integrity of the information that's gathered there. >> bob, what does this say to you, that this site
that are on the ground in libya. there is one u.s. navy destroyer off of the coast and another coming there, too and f.b.i. agents and as well a stepped up drone surveillance. we are talking about a terror manhunt in libya. in addition to the motivator of that film made in the u.s., it could be a complex organization to take out u.s. officials with an al-qaida link. we are looking at the video we have seen coming from the who is citing that the al-qaida number two was killed by the u.s. and called on action from the u.s.. a complex and fluid situation, back to you. >> gretchen: thank you. >> brian: how does the united states respond? former director of national intelience who worked in the worst situation . ambassador, welcome. what is our best next step first of course in libya? >> let mow say that chris stevens, we lost an exemptary diplomat. he was the kind of example of expeditionary diplomacy that characterized our hot spots . we will mourn his loss and miss him greatly. as far as the next step, we have to wait this situation out a bit and at least get past the friday prayers tomorrow and see how tha
people. >> charlie, will we see a coordination between the fbi and american official who are coming and the libyan security officials in benghazi? >> reporter: yes, from what we understand that investigation is already under way. interestingly, we didn't see investigators at the compound. yes, they are spreading out throughout the benghazi area in the hunt for the people that are responsible for this, but the eyewitnesses we spoke to said it was a rally. it was an anti-american protest, but it was largely peaceful. what happened after that seemed to have been guided, and it wasn't out of anger. this wasn't a rally or an anti-american protest that exploded. this seemed to be an attack on the u.s. consulate. >> thank you very much. senior correspondent john miller, senior director of national intelligence along with lara logan. good morning. what do we know about the people behind the attack in benghazi? >> not much. i mean, right now we're in the stage, a critical stage, of attribution, which is how do we figure out who it was if it wasn't a spontaneous mob? given the equipment, the
the libyan people. >> charlie, will we see a coordination between the fbi and american officials who are coming and the libyan security officials in benghazi? >> reporter: from what we understand from libyan officials we've spoken to, that investigation is already under way. although, interestingly, we didn't see any investigators aat the compound, but yet they are spreading throughout the ben z gazi area. it was a rally, anti-american protest, but largely peaceful. what happened after that seems to have been guided and it wasn't out of anger. this wasn't an anti-american protest that exploded. this seemed to be an attack on the u.s. consulate. >> thank you very much, senior correspondent, john miller, along with chief correspondent lara logan. good morning. >> good morning. >> what do we know about the people behind the attack in benghazi? >> not much. we're in a critical stage of attribution, which is how do we figure out who it was if it wasn't a spontaneous mob? the people who showed up after the demonstrators with the guns, it was much more likely it was an organized group. tw
that i am comfortable that the secretary of state, the secretary of defense, the fbi, promptly launched a thorough and searching investigation on the ground in benghazi to learn exactly what happened and what was a chaotic and confusing situation. and i am confident that we continue to have a leadership role in the world as the president laid out today in front of the united nations, rooted in american values, but that will not louis lambist jihadist terrorists to push us out of the region. >> so when you say you're confident in what is happening on the ground, let me put the question directly to you, then. why is that when cnn was in the consulate days after the horrible attack, they found that the -- the diary of ambassador stevens' thoughts and his fears. and not t u.s. investigators. why weren't they the ones who found something like that, which was -- was just lying there? >> that's an excellent question. we did not get briefed on the specifics of cnn's acquisition and use of the private diary of ambassador stevens. that wasn't one of the topics on which we were briefed. that does
work, tracking militant extremist groups in the region. they also say that at least some fbi agents are on the ground in benghazi. we've got a couple of sources saying otherwise but all agree that the insecurity situation in this country is making detective work on this crime very difficult indeed. finally, patti ann, back to that new word about the last hours of ambassador stevens. the libyan government is now saying he was alive when libyan civilians found him inside that smokey consulate building. then they brought him out, brought him to a hospital where he then died. a doctor at the hospital said he tried very hard to save him and just couldn't. back to you. patti ann: greg palkot live in trend polely. thank you. jon: well with the white house is taking heat for repeated statements that the attack on our consulate in libya grew out of a spontaneous protest. chris wallace put it very bluntly to one of the president's top campaign advisors. >> ambassador rice give the american people bad information? jon: so things got very interesting from there. we'll show you how it all played
of treating it like it's a "law & order" issue, rather than a war on terrorism. they have sent the f.b.i. over who had to cool their heels for days before they could even get in there, and i don't know if they are in benghazi yet. but, you know, i heard yesterday about this journal that was found by -- of the ambassador, three days after the attack by a journalist walking through the compound. this is just lew ludicrous. on the face of it the way they are handling this is so incompetent, and treating it again like it's a "law & order" issue, they've sent the f.b.i. to investigate, like when they find out what is wrong are they going to try to arrest somebody in libya? bill: we'll be in touch with your office and find out what you find out. thank you for your time. i want to bring in senior brooks, a senior fellow for national security affairs. peter what is going on here. >> i have the same concerns that the chairman has, he just expressed, and he's probably better informed than i am. we see all of these loose treads on this narrative coming out of the white house. my sense at this point becau
of america there are fbi agents and intelligence analysts already in libya investigating and we will find the culprits of the death of our ambassador. >> bill: they have to be killed. we have to get them not the libyans, would veto get them. >> look, look. i think that american interests are american interests. we should protect our interest. it is what we are doing all over the world. in this war on terrorism. >> bill: okay, now, should the president have been a little bit stronger about the egyptian situation because we all know and you better than most because you are in the intel committee, all right, that the egyptian government could have stopped this cold and chose not to so, therefore, american lives are put in danger and american property destroyed. should the president have come out and said that better not happen again and we're not going to tolerate it in a much stronger way than he did? >> you know, diplomacy really tough. and ambassador stevens gave his life in the name of diplomacy there are things, bill, you and i know are set and communicated sometimes not publicly so tha
to join in the hunt for them. the fbi is also investigating. as we said at the top of the program, american warships armed with cruise missiles have begun steaming closer to libya. a marine unit is headed to tripoli to protect the embassy there and other forces may be called to beef up protection globally. >> we're working with the government of libya to secure our diplomats. i have directed my administration to increase our security at diplomatic posts around the world, and make no mistake, we will work with the libyan government to bring to justice the killers who attacked our people. >> well, later today after that speech, on the cbs evening news, president obama also had sharp words for mitt romney, who's come under fire from democrats and some republicans for his statements lashing out at the obama administration's response to the attacks in benghazi and cairo. statements that whatever you believe about american foreign policy are simply not factual. we'll get to the battle over that in a moment. first we do want to focus on the attacks themselves, what happened last night an
in advance by a jihadist group. the fbi is investigating. and dozens of u.s. marines have been sent to beef up security for americans in libya. cnn's jomana karadsheh is on the phone. she's joining us from tripoli, libya, right now. jomana, tell us what happened based on all of the evidence, all of the reporting you're doi doing. [ technical difficulties ] jomana, i don't know if you can hear me. i'll try to fix that and get back to you. i think we've lost connections with jomana. we're going to get back to her. let me walk over here. the chairman of the house intelligence committee, mike rogers, is standing by. he's got -- he's been fully briefed on what's going on. mr. chairman, thanks very much for coming in. >> thanks, wolf. thanks for having me. >> based on what you have been told and all the information you have what you can share with our viewers here in the unit states and around the world, first of all, who did this? who killed these four americans? >> the actual identity we're still working through the final details of exactly. i think we're getting close to being able to identify
, particularly in the benghazi area. >> reporter: the fbi is leading the investigation. their team now on the ground in libya responsible for collecting the evidence intended to help whittle down that suspect list. >> we are conducting interviews, gathering evidence and trying to sort out the facts working with our partners both from a criminal standpoint as well as in the intelligence community to try to determine exactly what took place on the ground that evening. >> reporter: there are significant challenges facing u.s. investigators and the intelligence community. for one, getting a level of granularity that will allow them to identify individuals and their associations with various groups. another challenge, sifting through whatever information or evidence was left behind at a crime scene that was never really secured. all against a backdrop of concern for the investigators' safety. >> the fbi has a track record of being able to go into these places that are volatile and be able to put together a criminal case. we've done it in yemen with the coal bombing. we did it in east africa
's an fbi investigation that's ongoing and we look to that investigation to give us the definitive word as to what transpired. but putting together the best information that we have available to us today, our current assessment is that what happened in benghazi was, in fact, initially a spontaneous reaction to what had just transpired hours before in cairo, almost a copycat of the demonstrations against our facility in cairo, which were prompted, of course, by the video. what we think then transpired in benghazi is that opportunistic extremist elements came to the consulate as this was unfolding. they came with heavy weapons, which unfortunately, are readily available in postrevolutionary libya. and it escalated into a much more violent episode. obviously, that's our best judgment now. we'll await the results of the investigation, and the president has been very clear we'll work with the libyan authorities to bring those responsible to justice. >> was there a failure here that this administration is responsible for, whether it's an intelligence failure, a failure to see this coming, or
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 74 (some duplicates have been removed)